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Henry Medina: From banking to Litquidity, the humble trailblazer rises.

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TLDR:

  • Henry Medina, a former Jefferies analyst and Deutsche Bank associate, runs the popular finance satirical Instagram account Litquidity.
  • Medina is described as “humble,” “quiet,” and nondescript, but is known for his savage finance satire.
  • He spent two years in banking before leaving to work at a private equity firm and then returning to Deutsche Bank as an associate.
  • Medina’s banking friends include Richard Handler, the CEO of Jefferies, who is his mentor.
  • Medina recently went public with his true identity and plans to turn Litquidity into a holding company that invests in brands aligned with its fanbase.

If you came across Henry Medina, the man behind the popular finance satire Instagram account Litquidity, on the street, you would never know that he’s the genius behind the account. Medina, a former Jefferies analyst and Deutsche Bank associate, is described as “humble,” “quiet,” and nondescript. He is known for his savage finance satire and has gained a significant following on Instagram.

Medina spent two years in banking before taking a break to work at a private equity firm. He later returned to Deutsche Bank as an associate. Although he excelled in his skills in Excel at Jefferies, his return to Deutsche Bank was not as successful. Medina has described the experience as losing his power and becoming the bank’s “bitch.”

Despite his unsuccessful banking career, Medina has found success outside of finance. He charges $1,000 to bankers who want to talk to him and has valued Litquidity at $20 million. He also has various side gigs, including a private members club, a venture capital firm, and a role as a scout at Bain ventures.

Medina recently revealed his true identity and plans to turn Litquidity into a holding company that invests in brands aligned with its fanbase. His mentor, Richard Handler, the CEO of Jefferies, has reportedly nurtured his Instagram career.

Medina’s decision to go public with his true identity comes after struggling with “crippling anxiety.” He felt that maintaining anonymity helped with his anxiety, but decided to reveal himself now. He has big plans for the future of Litquidity and hopes to continue to provide finance satire while also investing in other brands.

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